Digital Data Management - General Module - Learn and Teach
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Digital Data Management - General Module

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[Slide 1]

Bringing Digital Data Management Training into Methods Courses
for Anthropology

General Principles and Practices of
Digital Data Management

Arienne M. Dwyer, Blenda Femenías, Lindsay Lloyd-Smith,

Kathryn Oths, and George H. Perry

2016

[Slide 2]

Recommended citation:

Dwyer, Arienne M., Blenda Femenías, Lindsay Lloyd-Smith, Kathryn Oths, and George H. Perry.  “General Principles and Practices of Digital Data Management.” In Bringing Digital Data Management Training into Methods  Courses for Anthropology, edited by Blenda Femenías. Arlington, VA: American Anthropological Association, 2016.

http://www.americananthro.org/methods

© American Anthropological Association 2016

 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

 

Bringing Digital Data Management Training into Methods Courses for Anthropology is a set of five modules:
General Principles and Practices of Digital Data Management
Archaeology: Principles and Practices of Digital Data Management
Biological Anthropology: Principles and Practices of Digital Data Management
Cultural Anthropology: Principles and Practices of Digital Data Management
Linguistic Anthropology: Principles and Practices of Digital Data Management

Project support: National Science Foundation, Workshop Grant 1529315; Jeffrey Mantz, Program Director, Cultural Anthropology

[Slide 3]

Organization

  1. What are data?
  2. What is data management?
  3. What are the advantages of making data accessible?
  4. What are ethical dimensions of data management?
  5. What is a data management plan?
  6. Exercises
  7. References
  8. Acknowledgments

[Slide 4]

What are data?

The recorded factual materials that are commonly accepted in the scientific community as necessary to validate research findings. These include:

[Slide 5]

What is data management?

A purposeful approach to data across the project lifecycle and beyond

Data management encompasses

[Slide 6]

What is data management?

[In-class exercise: Consult NSF data management web information]

[Slide 7]

What are the advantages of making data accessible?

Making data accessible

[Slide 8]

What are the advantages of making data accessible?

[Slide 9]

What are ethical dimensions of data management?

Anthropologists’ responsibilities prior to and during data collection, and decision-making about future access, include

[Slide 10]

What are ethical dimensions of data management?

Decision making about data collection includes careful consideration of appropriate reasons not to collect data, share data, or make data accessible.

Further discussion of such considerations is available in the American Anthropological Association’s Principles of Professional Responsibility (2012) and Handbook on Ethical Issues in Anthropology (1987).

[Outside-class exercise: Consult AAA Handbook on Ethical Issues]

[Slide 11]

What is a data management plan?

For a given project or research program, the data management plan (DMP) documents the approach to data management across the project’s full lifecycle.

The DMP:

[Slide 12]

In-class exercise: Data management at the NSF

Look at the FAQs page of the National Science Foundation, identify key features of its approach to data management, and relate this approach to Anthropology.

  1. National Science Foundation (NSF), Data Management & Sharing Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs), http://www.nsf.gov/bfa/dias/policy/dmpfaqs.jsp#2.

    Identify and discuss 3 items that you consider to be important aspects of this agency’s position on collecting and archiving of data. Choose your own FAQ or one of these from that webpage: 

    3. Am I required to deposit my data in a public database?
    7. Does data management and access include supporting documentation and metadata, such as validation protocols, field notebooks, etc.?
    10. What are NSF’s expectations regarding the release of data that include sensitive information (e.g., information about individuals or locations of endangered species)?

  2. Discuss some ways in which concepts and practices specific to Anthropology might correlate, or potentially conflict with, the answers provided.

[Slide 13]

Outside-class exercise: Ethics

In the Introduction to the AAA Handbook on Ethical Issues in Anthropology, editors Joan Cassell and Sue-Ellen Jacobs present the subject of ethics in Anthropology as one having both philosophical and practical dimensions that become salient in ordinary situations. They state:

In the field especially, situations may be so complex, involve so many parties and so much factionalism, that it becomes difficult to decide what must be done.… [Having] a code of ethics can help improve anthropological practice… [and] heighten sensitivity to professional conduct. In this twofold approach, a code is concerned with aspirations as well as avoidances; it represents our desire and attempt to respect the rights of others, fulfill obligations, avoid harm, and augment benefits to those we interact with as anthropologists.

  1. Identify some “aspirations” that you think connect significantly with “sensitivity to professional conduct” and ways to “augment benefits” to people with whom anthropologists interact.
  2. How can data collection and data management practices intersect positively with these aspirations, sensitivities, and benefits? Name and discuss several specific practices that you see as having particularly positive or negative effects.

[Slide 14]

References

Cassell, Joan, and Sue-Ellen Jacobs, eds. Handbook on Ethical Issues in Anthropology. Special publication No. 23. Arlington, VA:American Anthropological Association, 1987. http://www.americananthro.org/LearnAndTeach/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1942&navItemNumber=731

Cliggett, Lisa. Qualitative Data Archiving in the Digital Age: Strategies for Data Preservation and Sharing. The Qualitative Report 18 (2013): 1-11. http://www.nova.edu/ssss/QR/QR18/cliggett1.pdf

Jahnke, Lori M., and Andrew Asher. The Problem of Data: Data Management and Curation Practices among University Researchers. Washington, DC: Council on Library and Information Resources, 2014. http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub154/problem-of-data

Levine, Melissa. “Policy, Practice and Law.” In DH Curation Guide: A Community Resource Guide to Data Curation in the Digital Humanities. 2016. https://guide.dhcuration.org/contents/policy-practice-and-law/

National Information Standards Organization. Understanding Metadata. Bethesda: NISO, 2004.  http://niso.org/publications/press/UnderstandingMetadata.pdf

Nicholas, George, Catherine Bell, Rosemary Coombe, John R. Welch, Brian Noble, Jane Anderson, Kelly Bannister, and Joe Watkins. “Intellectual Property Issues in Heritage Management. Part 2: Legal Dimensions, Ethical Considerations, and Collaborative Research Practices.” Journal of Heritage Management 3 (2010): 117-47. http://ssrn.com/abstract=2463899

Silverman, Sydel, and Nancy J. Parezo, eds. Preserving the Anthropological Record. New York: Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, 1992.

Strasser, Carlyn. Research Data Management: A Primer Publication of the National Information Standards Organization. Bethesda: National Information Standards Organization, 2015. http://www.niso.org/apps/group_public/download.php/15375/PrimerRDM-2015-0727.pdf

Van den Eynden, Veerla, and Libby Bishop. Incentives and Motivations for Sharing Research Data, a Researcher’s Perspective. A Knowledge Exchange Report. 2014. http://repository.jisc.ac.uk/5662/1/KE_report-incentives-for-sharing-researchdata.pdf

[Slide 15]

[logo] American Anthropological Association

Advancing Knowledge, Solving Human Problems
Acknowledgments

Modules: Writers, Arienne M. Dwyer, Blenda Femenías, Lindsay Lloyd-Smith, Kathryn Oths, George H. Perry; Editor, Blenda Femenías

Discussants:  Workshop One, February 12, 2016: Andrew Asher, Candace Greene, Lori Jahnke, Jared Lyle, Stephanie Simms
Workshop Two, May 13, 2016: Phillip Cash Cash, Jenny Cashman, Ricardo B. Contreras, Sara Gonzalez, Candace Greene, Christine Mallinson, Ricky Punzalan, Thurka Sangaramoorthy, Darlene Smucny, Natalie Underberg-Goode, Fatimah Williams Castro, Amber Wutich
 
American Anthropological Association:
Executive Director, Edward Liebow
Project Manager, Blenda Femenías
Research Assistant, Brittany Mistretta
Executive Assistant, Dexter Allen
Professional Fellow, Daniel Ginsberg
Web Services Administrator, Vernon Horn
Director, Publishing, Janine Chiappa McKenna



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