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In This Section

Annual Reports

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In This Section

 

AAA Annual Reports

AAA Committee & Commission Reports

AAA Section Reports

All reports available in this section are archived by year, beginning with the most recent with the exception of AAA Annual Reports.


 

AAA Annual Reports 

This section features a historical repository of AAA Annual Reports. Recent AAA Annual Reports can be found here

Anthropology: Democracy, Inclusiveness, Transparency 2009 Annual Report

An Engaged Anthropology 2008 Annual Report

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AAA Committee & Commission Reports

Annual Meeting Executive Program Committee
The AMEPC was first formed in 2002 to assist the AAA Program Chair(s) with planning and scheduling the Annual Meeting Program. In 2013, the charge of the AMEPC was modified in response to recommendations made by a Task Force commissioned in 2011 to evaluate potential modifications to the Annual Meeting and to a directive by the EB to move oversight of the AMEPC from the ACC to the AOC for a three-year trial period. 

Reports available: 2013; 2012; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 2004; 20032002

Anthropological Communication Committee (formerly Committee on Scientific Communication)
This committee is responsible for reviewing matters concerning intradisciplinary communications, focusing on our two major vehicles, publications and the AAA Annual Meeting. The committee receives the report of the Annual Meeting Program Chair and reviews manuscripts submitted for the Special Publication series. Please note, this committee was formerly known as the Committee on Scientific Communication (CSC).

Reports available: 2013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 20032002

Association Operations Committee
This committee reviews Association administrative issues, academic and external relations, governance issues, membership benefits, section relations, and financial resources.

Reports available: 2013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 20042003

Audit Committee
Represent the AAA Executive Board in overseeing the establishment and implementation of appropriate accounting policies and internal controls, with focus on assuring that proper stewardship is placed over the AAA's assets and protection of its reputation through fiscal transparency. To assess the business risks and determine whether there is adequate planning for those risks. To monitor the roles of the board, management and internal and external auditors in order to ensure that good financial governance practices are followed. To review and recommend to the AAA Executive Board the acceptance of the external audit report.

Reports available: 2013; 2012; 2011; 2009; 20082007

Awards Committee
This committee organizes and reviews the nominations for specific AAA awards and selects a recommended winner for each.

Reports available: 2013; 2012; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 20042002

Committee on Ethics
The Committee on Ethics is a standing committee of the Association, which is responsible for the design and implementation of the Association's ethics education and advisory program.

Reports available: 2013; 2012; 2011; 2009; 2006; 2005; 2004; 20032002

Committee on Gender Equity Issues in Anthropology (formerly COSWA)
The Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology (CoGEA) monitors the status of gender equity in the discipline and the American Anthropological Association, advising the Executive Board and educating members. The Committee reports to the Executive Board. Members are elected from and by the AAA membership at large.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 20042002

Committee on Human Rights
To promote and protect human rights; to expand the definition of human rights within an anthropological perspective; to work internally with the membership of the AAA, to educate anthropologists, and to mobilize their support for human rights; to work externally with foreign colleagues, the people and groups with whom anthropologists work, and other human rights organizations to develop an anthropological perspective on human rights and consult with them on human rights violations and the appropriate actions to be taken; to influence and educate the media, policy makers, non-governmental organizations, and decision makers in the private sector; to encourage research on all aspects of human rights from conceptual to applied.

Reports available: 2013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 2004; 20032002

Committee on Labor Relations
To provide the AAA Executive Board and AAA Meetings Department information about labor conditions relevant to the EB's decisions about the scheduling of AAA annual meetings at the earliest possible stage of decision-making. To provide the AAA Executive Board information about labor conditions relevant to other EB decisions in regard to vendors and subcontractors, to the extent that it is feasible to do so. To seek information exchanges with other scholarly associations in regard to the above. To communicate regularly with the leadership of the EB, ACC, and AOC regarding significant issues relevant to the CLR’s charge. To provide the AAA membership with information about labor conditions relevant to anthropologists through such means as panels, meetings, and articles in the Anthropology Newsletter. When appropriate to provide the EB with information about labor conditions relevant to the employment of anthropologists and to advise them about possible positions and actions they might consider with respect to that information.

Reports available: 2013; 20122011

Committee on Minority Issues in Anthropology 
In 1992 a Planning Group for a AAA Commission on Minority Issues recommended the creation of a Commission on Minority Issues, which was tasked with creating the organization and objectives of a standing Committee on Minority Issues in Anthropology.In 1993 that Commission determined three focal areas of concern for the new standing Committee: attracting minorities to the discipline and the Association; overcoming the alienation of Native Americans to the discipline, and defining anthropology's roles in public discourses about cultural diversity.In 2007 the AAA Executive Board established the Commission on Race and Racism in Anthropology (CRRA) to review and make recommendations regarding the organization and responsibilities of the CMIA.Based on the CRRA recommendations, the charge and structure of the CMIA were modified in 2013.

Reports available: 2013; 2012; 2011; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 20042003

Committee on Practicing Applied and Special Interest Anthropology
The Committee on Practicing, Applied and Public Interest Anthropology was established to explore and engage the range of issues emerging as a result of the increasing number of anthropologists in and outside the academy doing practicing, applied and public interest work. The responsibilities of the Committee range from establishing liaisons with appropriate Sections to help serve the interest of practicing, applied and public anthropology, to developing recommendations for training and professional development.

Reports available: 2013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 20092008

Committee on Public Policy
The Committee on Public Policy was established in 1998, on the recommendation of the Task Force on Public Policy. The Task Force was established in 1997 to review AAA's public policy efforts and chart future directions. 
The Committee has both internal and external missions. It is staffed by the AAA Department of Government Affairs. The Committee's internal mission is to develop public policy expertise and enhance public policy debate among anthropologists within the AAA. The Committee will do this through events such as public policy forums, sessions and workshops at the annual meeting as well as network building. The Committee's external mission is to enhance the effectiveness of AAA and anthropologists in working with policy makers and other organizations, in order to strengthen the public profile of the AAA and anthropology. The Committee is also dedicated to educating policy makers on issues where anthropological expertise can be brought to bear.

Reports available: 2013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2007; 2006; 2005; 2004; 20032002

Committee on the Future of Print and Electronic Publishing 
The AAA Committee on the Future of Print and Electronic Publishing is established:
1. To recommend policies to AAA's Anthropological Communications Committee and Finance Committee
2. To mutually advise and consult with the AAA staff
3. To advise and represent the AAA sections and AAA members.

Reports available: 2013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 20082007

Committee on World Anthropologies (formerly Commission on World Anthropologies)
Identify significant issues that are shared among anthropologists from different nations. Develop clear objectives for drawing US and international anthropologists together in ways that benefit anthropology globally. Engage a diversity of international voices and perspectives and involve both academic and applied anthropologists in this endeavor.

Reports available: 2013; 20122008

Finance Committee
To ensure the financial stability of the American Anthropological Association through the ongoing assessment and monitoring of AAA’s annual operating budget, investment portfolio, grants and contribution activities, and annual audit report. Periodically develop, review, and/or modify financial and investment policy guidelines and financial performance benchmarks in support of AAA’s long-range plan. Make recommendations, as appropriate, to Executive Board.

Reports available: 2013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 20042003

Nominations Committee
To organize and recommend candidates for all open, elected AAA positions.

Reports available: 2013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2006; 2005; 20042002

Resource Development Committee
To actively support AAA's development program through the formulation of strategies and activities that will serve to increase member and/or corporate contributions and/or gifts. Directly cultivate, solicit, and provide stewardship of AAA members through education, annual giving, planned giving, and other such efforts.

Reports available: 2013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 20042002

Anthropology Education Committee (Inactive)
The AEC (Anthropology Education Committee) is charged with promoting the high quality, effective, and equitable teaching of anthropology at all levels as a means of increasing public understanding of anthropology.

Reports available: 2008; 2007; 2006; 20052002

AnthroSource Steering Committee
This report highlights major areas of work for the first year of AnthroSource Steering Committee (ASSC), November 2003 to November 2004, and outlines ongoing issues and areas needing attention. This review coincides with initial implementation of Phase 1 production of AnthroSource. ASSC made important progress in developing strategic infrastructure vital to the success of AnthroSource, while also advising (within the parameters of AAA/UC Press contract) on details of implementation and launch.

Reports available: 2004

Commission on Race and Racism in Anthropology (Inactive)
The American Anthropological Association (AAA) and its members are committed to the principles of inclusion and social justice. This commitment is manifest in much of our research and work, not least an ambitious public education program on RACE. However, we recognize that as a profession anthropology in North America is not as diverse as it should be. Many personal experiences attest repeatedly to the continuation of exclusion and privileging by race, ethnicity, class, and gender in numerous settings and institutions in which we are educated and pursue our craft.

Reports available: 20092008

Long-Range Planning Committee (Inactive)
The principal purposes of long-range planning for the Association are: to reaffirm the Association's central role in advancing anthropology; to determine which activities in pursuit of its mission are best carried out as Association-wide activities; to encourage the Sections of the Association to develop long-range goals and plans; to provide a basis for setting priorities in the face of legitimate but competing claims for limited AAA resources, leading to a coherent approach to helping advance anthropology as a discipline and a profession, within higher education and society at-large; and to rekindle and strengthen the sense of common purpose among AAA members through an open and inclusive planning process. The Committee on Long-Range Planning stresses the importance of strengthening the sense of common purpose among Association members.

Reports available: 2006; 2005; 20042003

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AAA Section Reports

American Ethnological Society 
The American Ethnological Society is the oldest professional anthropological organization in the United States. Founded in 1842 to encourage research in the emerging field of ethnology, its stated goal was to foster “inquiries generally connected with the human race.” Today the AES, a section of the American Anthropological Association (AAA), is a thriving group of nearly 4,000 anthropologists who organize an annual meeting, publish the journal American Ethnologist, and carry on a variety of activities to promote scholarship on “ethnology in the broader sense of the term.”

Reports available: 20142013; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2004; 2003; 20022001

Anthropology and Environment Section
The Anthropology and Environment Society is a section of the American Anthropological Association. Its membership as of 2013 is 740.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 2004; 20032001

Archaeology Division
The Archaeology Division of the American Anthropological Association was founded in 1983 to advance the study of archaeology as an aspect of anthropology, to provide a forum for members to discuss issues central to the development of archaeology, and to foster the publication and communication of the results of archaeological research and interpretations to anthropologists, to other scholars, and to the general public. Members of the Archaeology Division receive the AAA flagship journal, the American Anthropologist, and publications in the Archaeological Papers of the American Anthropological Association series.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2003; 20022001

Association for Africanist Anthropology
The purpose of the Association for Africanist Anthropology (AFAA) shall be to stimulate, strengthen, and advance anthropology by promoting the study of Africa, as well as Africanist scholarship and the professional interests of Africanist anthropologists in the U.S., and both in and outside of the African Continent.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 20042002

Association for Feminist Anthropology
The Association for Feminist Anthropology is a section of the American Anthropological Association which aims to foster the development of feminist analytic perspectives in all dimensions of anthropology.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 20062004

Association for Political and Legal Anthropology
APLA is committed to promoting the critical anthropology of politics and law within anthropology, across disciplines, and in the broader public sphere.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 2004; 2003; 20022001

Association for Queer Anthropology
The Association for Queer Anthropology (AQA), formerly known as the Society of Lesbian and Gay Anthropologists (SOLGA), is a section of the American Anthropological Association and was founded in 1988. AQA serves the interests of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and other queer and allied anthropologists in the American Anthropological Association. AQA promotes anthropological research and education on homosexuality, bisexuality, transgender/transsexuality, and other sexual and gender identities and expressions, and their intersections with race, class, disability, nationality, colonialism and globalization. AQA supports and encourages a diverse membership within the AAA and actively seeks to increase that diversity along lines of race, class, disability, nationality, gender, sexuality, and other forms of social difference.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 2004; 2003; 20022001

Association for the Anthropology of Policy
The Interest Group for the Anthropology of Public Policy (IGAPP) moved to AAA section status in summer 2012. The new section, called the Association for the Anthropology of Policy, or ASAP, has been set up to meet an important and increasingly recognized need. It is an institutionalized means for anthropologists studying policy issues to meet and engage in discussion.

Reports available: 20142013

Association of Black Anthropologists 
The Association of Black Anthropologists (ABA) was founded in 1970. The Association of Black Anthropologists (ABA) brings together Black Anthropologists and other scholars who are concerned with the goals of the ABA and who support its activities.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 20082007

Association of Indigenous Anthropologists
The purpose of Association of Indigenous Anthropologists (AIA) is to: advance anthropological study relating to Indigenous peoples, both past and present; support and encourage the professional development of members by supporting a forum for respectful and engaged discussion of common issues and current work; provide a network for the support and encouragement of Indigenous undergraduate and graduate students of anthropology; increase intellectual exchange by sponsoring symposia, sessions, workshops, exhibitions and publications; advance and facilitate stronger ties between Indigenous communities and the field of anthropology; encourage professional work that will benefit both the discipline of anthropology and Indigenous communities. 

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2011; 20102009

Association of Latina and Latino Anthropologists
The Association of Latino & Latina Anthropologists is a section of the American Anthropological Association, founded in 1990. ALLA’s mission is: To support student and early career scholars working toward excellence in anthropological research and practice by, with, and about Latino peoples in the U.S., however they are identified; To highlight scholarship and practice that is ideologically, epistemologically, and methodologically substantive and diverse; To enable a sustained diverse analysis of contemporary issues facing Latino communities in the U.S. and those with whom they share common experiences, histories, or languages.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 20072004

Association of Senior Anthropologists
The Association of Senior Anthropologists (ASA) of the American Anthropological Association offers senior and retired anthropologists, curators, researchers, linguists, archaeologists, and museum technicians a continuing presence and voice in the discipline, allowing them to put their accumulated knowledge and insights to significant use.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 20052004

Biological Anthropology Section
The Biological Anthropology Section (BAS) of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) comprises a wide range of anthropologists and students whose interests converge on questions related to the evolution and biological development of humans from a comparative perspective. Specific areas of interest include the study of non-human primates as models for understanding the evolutionary and ecological processes that shaped the biology and behavior of humans and our ancestors, studies of the fossil record of humans and hominids that reveal patterns of evolutionary change, and studies of the biology and genetics of modern humans for insights into adaptation and variation. 

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 2004; 2003; 20022001

Central States Anthropological Society
Founded in 1921 as the Central Section of the American Anthropological Association, the Central States Anthropological Society (CSAS) is a friendly, four-field professional society that welcomes students and anyone keen on promoting anthropology in the heartland, and beyond.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 2004; 20032002

Council for Museum Anthropology
The Council for Museum Anthropology is an all-volunteer membership organization that serves anthropologists and museum professionals. The Council for Museum Anthropology is a section of the American Anthropological Association. CMA’s mission is to foster the development of anthropology in the context of museums and related institutions.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 20072005

Council on Anthropology and Education
The mission of the Council on Anthropology and Education is to advance anti-oppressive, socially equitable, and racially just solutions to educational problems through research using anthropological perspectives, theories, methods, and findings.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 20042003

Culture and Agriculture
C&A aims to develop the study and understanding of agrarian systems from a holistic, social science perspective, and to link academics and practitioners concerned with agrarian issues, agricultural development, and agricultural systems through dissemination of scientific research, encouragement of effective instruction, and to encourage application of knowledge to public policy.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2009; 2008; 2007; 20062005

Evolutionary Anthropology Society
The Evolutionary Anthropology Society (EAS) is a section of the American Anthropological Association. We bring together all those interested in applying modern evolutionary theory to the analysis of human biology, behavior, and culture.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2011; 2008; 2007; 2006; 20052004

General Anthropology Division
The General Anthropology Division (GAD) is an evolving coalition of anthropologists interested in what unifies and cross-cuts the discipline. It stimulates conversations that span the subfields and provides a home for emerging interests and ideas. It raises broad questions, fosters the emergence of new areas of inquiry, and examines the structures and conditions that shape our lives as anthropologists. GAD is also the umbrella for several committees that examine particular cross-disciplinary issues, such as the history of anthropology, science and technology studies, anthropological teaching, and the nature of anthropology in small programs.

Reports available: 20142013; 20122010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2004; 20032002

Middle East Section
The Middle East Section (MES) of the American Anthropological Association convenes anthropologists with an interest in the peoples, cultures and histories of the Middle East. Our membership is noteworthy for its disciplinary diversity: socio-cultural anthropologists, linguistic anthropologists, physical anthropologists and archaeologists, as well as practicing anthropologists from these subdisciplines, all participate actively in the section, and our membership thrives on the participation of members from the United States, the Middle East, and from other parts of the world.

Reports available: 20142013; 20122010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2005; 2004; 20032002

National Association for the Practice of Anthropology
NAPA was founded in 1983 to promote the practice of anthropology and the interests of practicing anthropologists, and to further the practice of anthropology as a profession.

Reports available: 2014; 2013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 2004; 2003; 20022001

National Association of Student Anthropologists
The National Association of Student Anthropologists (NASA) is the student section of the American Anthropological Association founded in 1985 to address graduate and undergraduate student concerns and to promote the interests and involvement of students as anthropologists-in-training. NASA is a four-field network of students, which directly addresses issues that are of interest to both undergraduate and graduate students, including finding jobs, attending graduate school, fieldwork programs and networking.

Reports available: 2014; 2013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 2004; 2003; 20022001

Society for Cultural Anthropology
As scholars today face all sorts of possibilities—as well as the impositions of a great many restraints—the Society for Cultural Anthropology (SCA) is ever aware of the challenge of providing innovative, provocative, but also substantive benefits for its membership, for the academy, and for the many publics with whom we seek to engage. This has been an enduring concern since 1983 when this section was founded by figures like David Schneider, Clifford Geertz, and many others. Then as now, the SCA endeavors to put anthropology in conversation with the related humanities and social sciences—and emerging perspectives in the sciences—and in so doing to think critically about the received categories, as well as the established ethnographic genres, that shape so much of anthropological knowledge.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 20042002

Society for East Asian Anthropology 
SEAA is committed to developing international channels of communication among anthropologists throughout the world. We hope to promote discussion and share information on diverse topics related to the anthropology of Taiwan, PRC, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea; other societies/cultures of Asia and the Pacific Basin with historical or contemporary ties to East Asia; and diasporic societies/cultures identified with East Asia.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 20042003

Society for Economic Anthropology
The SEA is a group of anthropologists, economists, geographers, and scholars from other disciplines who are interested in the connections between economic and social life.

Reports available: 201420132012

Society for Humanistic Anthropology
The Society for Humanistic Anthropology (SHA) was founded at the 1974 meeting of the American Anthropological Association in Mexico City to open a dialogue on the means by which anthropologists might evoke, represent, or give account of the human subject both visually and in writing.

Reports available: 2014; 2013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 2004; 2003; 20022001

Society for Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology 
The first chapter of SLACA was founded by the American Anthropological Association (AAA) in 1969 to advance the study of Latin American anthropology. In 2005, the Society’s membership officially approved the adoption of “Caribbean” to the Society’s name to reflect the connections between the Latin American and Caribbean regions. SLACA provides a forum for discussion of current research, scholarly trends, and human rights concerns, as well as a space for interchange among scholars from and who work in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Reports available: 2014; 2013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 20052004

Society for Linguistic Anthropology
A group for linguistic anthropologists and lovers of questions of language and culture in general.

Reports available: 2014; 2013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 2004; 2003; 20022001

Society for Medical Anthropology
American Anthropology Association section promoting the anthropological study of health, illness, health care, and related topics.

Reports available: 2014; 2013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 2004; 2003; 20022001

Society for Psychological Anthropology
The Society for Psychological Anthropology (SPA) of the American Anthropological Association was founded in 1977. SPA is a broad, multidisciplinary organization of individuals interested in cultural, psychological, and social interrelations at all levels.

Reports available: 2014; 2013; 2012; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 2004; 2003; 20022001

Society for the Anthropological Sciences
The Society for Anthropological Sciences (SAS) was organised to promote empirical research and social science in anthropology. The members of SAS want to further the development of anthropological science as empirical knowledge based on testable theory, sound research design and systematic methods for the collection and analysis of data.

Reports available: 2014; 2013; 2012; 2010; 20092007

Society for the Anthropology in Community Colleges
SACC is a network of people who teach anthropology in community colleges, two-year and four-year colleges, universities and pre-collegiate institutions. A section of the American Anthropological Association (AAA), SACC was founded in 1978 to encourage dialogue and collaboration among teachers of anthropology across sub-disciplines and institutional settings, and to promote excellence in the teaching of anthropology.

Reports available: 2014; 2013; 2012; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2005; 2004; 20032001

Society for the Anthropology of Consciousness
The Society for the Anthropology of Consciousness (SAC), a section of the American Anthropological Association since 1990, is an interdisciplinary academic organization dedicated to the study of consciousness phenomena in cultures around the world.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2011; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 20052004

Society for the Anthropology of Europe
The SAE is the section of the American Anthropological Association that promotes the anthropological study of European societies and cultures and encourages connections between scholars working in Europe.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2005; 2004; 2003; 20022001

Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition
The Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition (SAFN), formerly known as the Council on Nutritional Anthropology (CNA), was organized in 1974 in response to the increased interest in the interface between social sciences and human nutrition.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 2004; 2003; 20022001

Society for the Anthropology of North America
The goal of the Society for the Anthro­pology of North Amer­ica is to address the need for a focused voice and insti­tutional pre­sence for the Anthro­po­logy of the Uni­ted States, Can­ada and Mex­ico.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2008; 2007; 2005; 20042003

Society for the Anthropology of Religion
The Society for the Anthropology of Religion (SAR) is a section of the American Anthropological Association (AAA). We seek to facilitate the research and teaching of the anthropology of religion. We wish to support anthropological approaches to the study of religion from all the subdisciplines: cultural anthropology, archaeology, physical anthropology, linguistic anthropology and others.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 2004; 2003; 20022001

Society for the Anthropology of Work
The Society for the Anthropology of Work (SAW) is a section of the American Anthropological Association, and is comprised of more than 200 members. The Society publishes the Anthropology of Work Review, an academic journal that facilitates exchanges between those engaged in the study of all dimensions of human work.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 2004; 2003; 20022001

Society for Urban, National, and Transnational/Global Anthropology
SUNTA, a section of the American Anthropological Association, concerns itself with theories, problems, processes, and institutions of urban, national and transnational life. Urban life and problems in the modern world are interrelated with national and transnational institutions (especially globalizing capitalism), processes, and forces. Likewise, nations and transnational institutions most express themselves and are expressed by people living in the global hierarchy of contemporary cities. SUNTA, therefore, particularly focuses on the interrelationships of urban, national, and transnational processes as they affect and are affected by the everyday social and cultural lives of people living, acting, and struggling in particular places, anthropology’s traditional area of concern.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2011; 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 2004; 20022001

Society for Visual Anthropology
The Society for Visual Anthropology (SVA) is a section of the American Anthropological Association. We promote the study of visual representation and media. Both research methods and teaching strategies fall within the scope of the society. SVA members are involved in all aspects of production, dissemination, and analysis of visual forms.

Reports available: 20142013; 2012; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 2004; 20022001

 

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