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American Anthropologist

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This page is designed to describe the American Anthropologist. If you are interested in the full-text content online, go to the journal homepage on AnthroSource. This page also details the Editorial Board.

American Anthropologist is the flagship journal of the American Anthropological Association with a distinguished history. It began publishing in 1888 and has a venerable list of editors including Melville Hersovitz, Sol Tax, George Spindler, among many others illustrious names. It currently is published on a quarterly basis with early view. American Anthropologist follows the mission statement and goals of the American Anthropological Association by advancing anthropology as a discipline that studies humankind in all its aspects, involving archaeological, biological, ethnological, and linguistic research. It furthers the professional interests of anthropologists by disseminating anthropological knowledge and illuminating its relevance to human problems.

Submissions to American Anthropologist

The editor of the journal seeks to further the Association's mission by publishing articles that add to, integrate, synthesize and interpret anthropological knowledge; essays on issues of importance to the discipline; research reports; obituaries; and reviews of books, films, videos, and exhibits.

The AA welcomes both manuscripts that originate within a single discipline and those that cross subdisciplines. In choosing articles for publication, the editor's principal consideration is to give preference to those submissions that present material that is important and new in the discipline theoretically, methodologically, and empirically. All other things being equal, the editors will also give preference to articles that demonstrate how anthropological research improves our understanding of issues of cultural significance and practical importance in both the present and past. To the extent possible, the main ideas of articles should be comprehensible to nonspecialists. The editors encourage clear writing and straightforward organization and discourage the overuse of jargon intelligible to only to those with particular theoretical perspectives.

Contributions from all subdisciplines in both their basic and applied dimensions are welcome, as are those focusing on broad, cross-cutting problems, themes, and theories. Collaborative work is encouraged and contributions from international colleagues are welcome. The journal does not charge authors for submission nor charge any publication fees.

Information on Submitting to American Anthropologist

 



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