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Familiar Strange: Attend the World's Largest Gathering of Anthropologists

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October 16, 2015

Contact Name: Anne Kelsey
Contact Email: akelsey@americananthro.org
Contact Phone: 571-483-1171

Familiar Strange: Attend the World's Largest Gathering of Anthropologists

The AAA Annual Meeting is the world’s largest gathering of anthropologists, granting you access to more than 6,000 experts who can shed light on a vast assortment of topics. Held November 18-22 in Denver, this meeting is an incredible opportunity to speak with researchers who are examining everything from the realities of the American health care system to tensions in the Middle East. Topics to be covered include: ebola, indigenous issues, environmental issues, education, racialized police violence, cannabis, and more.  

To register for press credentials or arrange for off-site interviews, email Anne Kelsey at akelsey@americananthro.org with your name, affiliation, and any specific topics you are looking to connect with an expert on.

The following sessions may be of particular interest:

WE WANT TO BREATHE: THE RACIALIZATION OF STATE VIOLENCE IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT
Sami Hermez, Gilberto A Rosas and Amahl A Bishara
This panel contemplates the complex linkages between state violence and racialization in multiple sites across the globe. The recent police killing of several unarmed black youth in the United States, the Israeli military onslaught unleashed on the Palestinians in Gaza, the disappearances and murder of students in Ayotzinapa, Mexico, and various other forms of terror wrought on non-white bodies around the world in the name of counter-terrorism, must be analyzed relationally.

PALESTINE-ISRAEL, ARCHAEOLOGY, AND BDS: PRACTICALITIES ON THE GROUND
Brian Boyd, Nadia Abu El-Haj, Randall McGuire and Iman Saca 
Doing Archaeology in Palestine-Israel in the 21st Century: what difference does BDS make? 

HUMANIZING CHILDBIRTH: NEGOTIATING WOMEN’S REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS IN THE FACE OF OBSTETRIC VIOLENCE
Mounia El Kotni, Lydia Zacher Dixon and Eugenia Georges
On October 4th, 2013, a 26 year-old indigenous Tsotsil woman arrives in labor at the Women’s Hospital in San Cristobal de Las Casas, in the southern Mexican state of Chiapas. After 36 hours without being attended, she is rushed into an emergency C-section, where a tubal ligation and gallbladder extraction are performed without her consent. Two days after entering the hospital, the young woman is turned over dead to her family. Such cases of dehumanized treatment in labor are unfortunately common worldwide; in recent years, the term “obstetric violence” has emerged to describe the myriad ways women’s bodies and rights are violated during childbirth. In this session, participants examine cases from Mexico, Peru, Canada and the US in which obstetric violence has become all too familiar, and look closely at movements that insist on the strangeness of such violence and are calling for reform and accountability.

A JOINT SESSION: THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF CANNABIS POLICY
William C Garriott III, Santiago I Guerra, William O. Beeman, Marty G Otanez, Emily Anne McDonald, Lia Berman, Mike Van Dyke, Chloe Villano and Daniel Rush
The legalization of cannabis for medical and recreational use in the United States has created a major shift in public policy throughout the nation, as a result of changing attitudes toward controlled substance use. This roundtable will focus on anthropological research on these shifting policies. It will bring together the most recent researchers conducting fieldwork-based investigation relating to the changing policy toward cannabis use along with public officials who are dealing with these changing policies on a daily basis. 

INDIGENOUS NETWORKS AND CLIMATE CHANGE
Julie K Maldonado, Heather Lazrus, Terry Scott Ketchum, Paulette L Blanchard, Shannon McNeeley, Marie Schaefer, Linda E Kruger, Bob Gough and Kyle Whyte
This roundtable discussion, which includes participants from several Indigenous networks, will address the following questions:  What are the opportunities and challenges of cross-cultural collaborations that bring together different ways of knowing and understanding about climate change?  What are the potential challenges, opportunities and benefits for Indigenous leaders, communities and scientists engaging together in these forums?

IN THE NAME-OF-THE-FATHER: QUEER RELATION TO AUTHORITY
Tamar R Shirinian and John Borneman
This panel explores the forms of authority that shape queer desire and queer life. These presenters will all show the ways in which queer desire and the desire of the nation/Father merge, diverge, and converge.

REGIMES OF PROOF: CRIME SCENES AND THE FORENSICS OF ANTHROPOLOGY
Richard A Wilson, Ieva Jusionyte, Robert Samet, Jeffrey T Martin and Charles L Briggs

STRANGE BREWS:  REIMAGINING COFFEE, CLASS AND CAPITALISM IN THE 21st CENTURY
Bradley R Wilson, Sarah G Grant and Sarah Lyon


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