Planned Giving - Participate & Advocate
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In This Section

Planned Giving

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Sept 2-5, 2020. The COMELA 2020 Call For Papers. The conference on Mediterranean and European Linguistic Anthropology. Submission Deadline: April 1

In This Section

WAYS TO GIVE

WILLS AND LIVING TRUSTS

A simple, flexible, and versatile way to ensure we can continue our work for years to come is a gift in your will or living trust, known as a charitable bequest. Bequests may be made in any amount, and may be unrestricted or designated for a specific program or purpose at the Association. The following types of bequests allow you to designate how your estate will be distributed.

SPECIFIC BEQUEST:
You describe exactly what you want to leave to a specific individual or organization and the designated source. If you want to leave a specific dollar amount from a specific source or a particular item (such as an antique or collector's item), this is the type of bequest that you would use.
Example: June states in her will: "I leave my stamp collection to my grandson, Gregory. I also leave my securities to AAA.”

GENERAL BEQUEST:
This type of bequest does not specify the source from which it should be paid. This gives your executor the flexibility to honor the bequest from any available source.
Example: Sarah states in her will: "I leave $50,000 to my nephew, Thomas.”

RESIDUARY BEQUEST:
This type of bequest is honored after all other bequests have been made, and all debts, expenses and taxes have been paid.
Example: Elaine states in her will: "I give all the rest, residue and remainder of my real and personal estate to AAA.”

CONTINGENT BEQUEST:
This type of bequest is fulfilled if certain conditions are met. For instance, if your primary beneficiary does not survive you, you can indicate your next choice through a contingent designation.
Example: Stephen states in his will: "I give all the rest, residue and remainder of my real and personal estate to my wife, Joan, if she survives me; if not, then 50 percent in equal shares to my children who survive me and 50 percent to AAA." 

BENEFICIARY DESIGNATIONS

You may designate the Association as a beneficiary to receive assets such as retirement plans, any IRA, 401(k), 403(b), life insurance policies, or a wide variety of financial accounts after you are gone. This option allows you to pass these assets tax-free and in full to the non-profit of your choice. It’s also flexible—you can review and adjust beneficiary designations anytime you want. 

IRA CHARITABLE ROLLOVER OR QUALIFIED CHARITABLE DISTRIBUTION

If you are 70½ years old or older, you can take advantage of a simple way to benefit AAA and receive tax benefits in return by giving any amount up to $100,000 per year from your IRA directly to a qualified non-profit organization such as ours without having to pay income taxes on the money. If you are at least 72 years old and have not yet taken your required minimum distribution for the year, your gift can satisfy all or part of that requirement.

DONOR ADVISED FUNDS (DAF)

A donor-advised fund is a like a personal charitable savings account that you can use to make a contribution of cash, stock, or other assets to support AAA, while taking an immediate tax deduction for the gift. These accounts are controlled by a sponsoring organization that invests the assets and manages the donor’s account. Once a fund is established, you can contact the administrator of your fund to recommend how much and how often you would like to support organizations that are near to your heart from your DAF.



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