Supporting Collective Access during Raising Our Voices 2020 - Attend Events
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Melissa Harris Perry at AAA 2016
Melissa Harris Perry at AAA 2016

In This Section

Supporting Collective Access during Raising Our Voices 2020

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Supporting Collective Access during Raising Our Voices 2020

We are excited that you plan to join us for Raising Our Voices 2020 fall virtual event series! All Raising Our Voices event submitters and participants are requested to join us in supporting collective access (a term by Mia Mingus and Sins Invalid). 

While preparing for your live-streamed or view-on-demand event for Raising Our Voices 2020, we encourage you to review this page so that you learn more about the accessible practices required and expected for the fall event series. This page outlines the practices, and other pages will provide specific tips, tricks, and tools for how to incorporate these practices, whether in preparation for and during a live-streamed event or when developing your view-on-demand event following the acceptance of your proposal. We encourage you to join us for the webinar trainings that will take place to support all submitters in supporting collective access.

Interactive Table of Contents

Live-Streamed Events

Live-streamed events will require speakers to prepare their material in advance to support ASL interpreters and CART captioners, as well as to be aware of accessible practices that should take place during a virtual live event.

Interview

Required Features

  1. List of Terms 
    • Why? A list of terms helps support CART captioners, ASL interpreters, and others who may need support with language.
  2. Accessible introductions of all speakers
    • Why? An accessible introduction helps support blind and low-vision attendees, as well as others whose processing requires additional auditory information of visuals and provides visual access to each speaker.
  3. Announcement of each speaker prior to speaking (i.e. “This is Ed.” “Nate speaking.”)
    • Why? Announcements prior to speaking helps people who are D/deaf, hard-of-hearing, blind, low-vision, or have an auditory processing disorder more easily follow the conversation.
  4. Visual description of relevant visual moments
    • What are "relevant visual moments"?  Relevant visual moments are moments in which the visual during the video changes.
      • This may be something such as you as the speaker lifting up a model of an artifact and describing the artifact (e.g. "I am now holding up to the camera a model of a skull of an Australopithecus afarensis. The skull is narrow and includes a smaller neurocranium, or braincase. There are also large canines visible and the jaw juts out forward. The parts of the model which indicate having been found are in a rough texture, whereas the rest of the model is a smooth plastic.")
      • Alternatively, this may also include a complete change in scenery. (e.g. "I am now walking outside, wearing a mask, on a beautiful sunny day, and the green lawns of the university campus surround me on either side of the walkway. Three people may be seen walking in a group at a distance wearing masks." or "A scene pans to the front podium of an otherwise empty classroom. The black chalkboard includes in writing "2019 Words of the Year" underlined, followed by a list: (my) pronouns, they, quid pro quo, ok boomer, and I oop-, nobody, people of means, im [drawing of a peach]."
    • Why? Visual descriptions helps support blind and low-vision attendees, as well as others whose processing requires additional auditory information of visuals, gain access to the visuals of the video.

Recommended Features

  1. Interview outline provided in advance as an accessible Word document
    • Why? An interview outline supports CART captioners, ASL interpreters, and others who may need support with processing content.

Return to Table of Contents

Conversations or Debates

Required Features

  1. List of Terms 
    • Why? A list of terms helps support CART captioners, ASL interpreters, and others who may need support with language.
  2. Accessible introductions of all speakers
    • Why? An accessible introduction helps support blind and low-vision attendees, as well as others whose processing requires additional auditory information of visuals and provides visual access to each speaker.
  3. Announcement of each speaker prior to speaking (i.e. “This is Ed.” “Nate speaking.”)
    • Why? Announcements prior to speaking helps people who are D/deaf, hard-of-hearing, blind, low-vision, or have an auditory processing disorder more easily follow the conversation.
  4. Visual description of relevant visual moments
    • What are "relevant visual moments"?  Relevant visual moments are moments in which the visual during the video changes.
      • This may be something such as you as the speaker lifting up a model of an artifact and describing the artifact (e.g. "I am now holding up to the camera a model of a skull of an Australopithecus afarensis. The skull is narrow and includes a smaller neurocranium, or braincase. There are also large canines visible and the jaw juts out forward. The parts of the model which indicate having been found are in a rough texture, whereas the rest of the model is a smooth plastic.")
      • Alternatively, this may also include a complete change in scenery. (e.g. "I am now walking outside, wearing a mask, on a beautiful sunny day, and the green lawns of the university campus surround me on either side of the walkway. Three people may be seen walking in a group at a distance wearing masks." or "A scene pans to the front podium of an otherwise empty classroom. The black chalkboard includes in writing "2019 Words of the Year" underlined, followed by a list: (my) pronouns, they, quid pro quo, ok boomer, and I oop-, nobody, people of means, im [drawing of a peach]."
    • Why? Visual descriptions helps support blind and low-vision attendees, as well as others whose processing requires additional auditory information of visuals, gain access to the visuals of the video.

Recommended Features

  1. Conversation/debate outline provided in advance as an accessible Word document
    • Why? An conversation/debate outline supports CART captioners, ASL interpreters, and others who may need support with processing content.

Return to Table of Contents

Roundtable/ “Town Hall”

Required Features

  1. List of Terms 
    • Why? A list of terms helps support CART captioners, ASL interpreters, and others who may need support with language.
  2. Accessible introductions of all speakers
    • Why? An accessible introduction helps support blind and low-vision attendees, as well as others whose processing requires additional auditory information of visuals and provides visual access to each speaker.
  3. Announcement of each speaker prior to speaking (i.e. “This is Ed.” “Nate speaking.”)
    • Why? Announcements prior to speaking helps people who are D/deaf, hard-of-hearing, blind, low-vision, or have an auditory processing disorder more easily follow the conversation.
  4. Visual description of relevant visual moments
    • What are "relevant visual moments"?  Relevant visual moments are moments in which the visual during the video changes.
      • This may be something such as you as the speaker lifting up a model of an artifact and describing the artifact (e.g. "I am now holding up to the camera a model of a skull of an Australopithecus afarensis. The skull is narrow and includes a smaller neurocranium, or braincase. There are also large canines visible and the jaw juts out forward. The parts of the model which indicate having been found are in a rough texture, whereas the rest of the model is a smooth plastic.")
      • Alternatively, this may also include a complete change in scenery. (e.g. "I am now walking outside, wearing a mask, on a beautiful sunny day, and the green lawns of the university campus surround me on either side of the walkway. Three people may be seen walking in a group at a distance wearing masks." or "A scene pans to the front podium of an otherwise empty classroom. The black chalkboard includes in writing "2019 Words of the Year" underlined, followed by a list: (my) pronouns, they, quid pro quo, ok boomer, and I oop-, nobody, people of means, im [drawing of a peach]."
    • Why? Visual descriptions helps support blind and low-vision attendees, as well as others whose processing requires additional auditory information of visuals, gain access to the visuals of the video.
  5. If slides are usedAccessible slides provided in advance in PPT and/or PDF format
    • Note: PPT can be checked for accessibility using the “Accessibility Checker” feature. PDF must be confirmed for accessibility using Acrobat Pro.
    • Why? Developing accessible slides helps people who use screen reader; are blind, low-vision, or colorblind; and who need visuals that are not overwhelming and easy to follow.

Recommended Features

  1. Discussion outline provided in advance as an Accessible word document
    • Why? A discussion outline supports CART captioners, ASL interpreters, and others who may need support with processing content.

Return to Table of Contents

View-on-Demand Events

All features listed below for view-on-demand events are required for submission. Please note that if you do not fulfill these expectations, your submission will not be included in the view-on-demand events library. 

Podcast

  1. Transcript
    • Why? A transcript ensures that people who are D/deaf, hard-of-hearing, DeafBlind, or have an auditory processing disorder are able to engage with the podcast. 

*If you selected to provide a "TalkBack Event", please also review the accessibility expectations below.

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Virtual Poster

  1. Accessible slide and PDF (PDF must be confirmed for accessibility using Acrobat Pro.)
    • Why? Developing accessible slides helps people who use screen reader; are blind, low-vision, or colorblind; and who need visuals that are not overwhelming and easy to follow.
  2. Visual description practices when referencing and discussing visuals on the poster
    • Why? Describing visuals, such as graphs, maps, pictures, cartoons, etc., and reading text on the poster helps support people who are blind or low-vision, who have a visual processing disorder, or who better process information through verbal explanations of visuals gain access to the visuals of the poster
    • Note: If you wish to avoid reading all text from the poster during your recording, we instead encourage you to outline each section of your poster prior to further discussing the work found on your poster, and to also invite the audience to review the poster using the file available in the platform. (e.g. "You may review this poster in detail by downloading the file from the Raising Our Voices platform.") 
  3. Transcript 
    • Why? A transcript ensures that people who are D/deaf, hard-of-hearing, DeafBlind, or have an auditory processing disorder are able to engage with the audio of your virtual poster.
  4. If video (of the speaker or surroundings) is used:
    1. Accessible introduction
      • Why? An accessible introduction helps support blind and low-vision attendees, as well as others whose processing requires additional auditory information of visuals and provides visual access to each speaker.
    2. Visual description of relevant visual moments
      • What are "relevant visual moments"?  Relevant visual moments are moments in which the visual during the video changes.
        • This may be something such as you as the speaker lifting up a model of an artifact and describing the artifact (e.g. "I am now holding up to the camera a model of a skull of an Australopithecus afarensis. The skull is narrow and includes a smaller neurocranium, or braincase. There are also large canines visible and the jaw juts out forward. The parts of the model which indicate having been found are in a rough texture, whereas the rest of the model is a smooth plastic.")
        • Alternatively, this may also include a complete change in scenery. (e.g. "I am now walking outside, wearing a mask, on a beautiful sunny day, and the green lawns of the university campus surround me on either side of the walkway. Three people may be seen walking in a group at a distance wearing masks." or "A scene pans to the front podium of an otherwise empty classroom. The black chalkboard includes in writing "2019 Words of the Year" underlined, followed by a list: (my) pronouns, they, quid pro quo, ok boomer, and I oop-, nobody, people of means, im [drawing of a peach]."
      • Why? Visual descriptions helps support blind and low-vision attendees, as well as others whose processing requires additional auditory information of visuals, gain access to the visuals of the video.

*If you selected to provide a "TalkBack Event", please also review the accessibility expectations below.

Return to Table of Contents

Three-Minute Thesis Competition

We recognize that the three-minute thesis competition has its own rules, and we would like to provide further explanations for how to implement the required accessible features while being respectful of the minimal time of your presentation. 

  1. Transcript 
    1. Why? A transcript ensures that people who are D/deaf, hard-of-hearing, DeafBlind, or have an auditory processing disorder are able to engage with the audio of your recording.
  2. Accessible introduction
    • Why? An accessible introduction helps support blind and low-vision attendees, as well as others whose processing requires additional auditory information of visuals and provides visual access to each speaker.
    • Note: You are welcome to keep this incredibly short and minimally detailed. This includes your name, pronouns as comfortable, gender and race and/or skin-tone as comfortable. In essence, think of what key visuals are provided by your appearance.
  3. No speed talking
    • Why? Speed talking makes it difficult for a variety of people to follow a presentation and understand the most critical information you want them to leave with.
    • Tip 1: Write a script, and practice it multiple times. If following a practice round your script is longer than 3 minutes, edit for length by removing non-essential content, or any content that may be considered "fluff", and avoid speaking more quickly to fit more information into three minutes. 
    • Tip 2: A reasonable presentation speaking rate will be between 100-150 words per minute (wpm). This means your script should be between 300-450 words. Cut your script if it is longer than 450 words.
  4. If a slide is used:
    1. Accessible slide and PDF (PDF must be confirmed for accessibility using Acrobat Pro.)
      • Why? Developing accessible slides helps people who use screen reader; are blind, low-vision, or colorblind; and who need visuals that are not overwhelming and easy to follow.
    2. Visual description practices when referencing and discussing visuals on the slide
      • Why? Describing visuals, such as graphs, maps, pictures, cartoons, etc., and reading text on the slide helps support people who are blind or low-vision, who have a visual processing disorder, or who better process information through verbal explanations of visuals gain access to the visuals of the poster. 
      • Note: Keep the visuals minimal so that you do not need to take too much time describing each visual.  Keep the text on your slide minimal so that you may take the time to read it and expand on each point you discuss. You do not need to read the text directly from the slide. We encourage you to invite the audience to review the slide using the file available in the platform. (e.g. "You may review this slide by downloading the file from the Raising Our Voices platform.")

Return to Table of Contents

Talk

  1. Transcript 
    • Why? A transcript ensures that people who are D/deaf, hard-of-hearing, DeafBlind, or have an auditory processing disorder are able to engage with the audio of your talk.
  2. If video is used:
    1. Accessible introduction
      • Why? An accessible introduction helps support blind and low-vision attendees, as well as others whose processing requires additional auditory information of visuals and provides visual access to each speaker.
    2. Visual description of relevant visual moments
      • What are "relevant visual moments"?  Relevant visual moments are moments in which the visual during the video changes.
        • This may be something such as you as the speaker lifting up a model of an artifact and describing the artifact (e.g. "I am now holding up to the camera a model of a skull of an Australopithecus afarensis. The skull is narrow and includes a smaller neurocranium, or braincase. There are also large canines visible and the jaw juts out forward. The parts of the model which indicate having been found are in a rough texture, whereas the rest of the model is a smooth plastic.")
        • Alternatively, this may also include a complete change in scenery. (e.g. "I am now walking outside, wearing a mask, on a beautiful sunny day, and the green lawns of the university campus surround me on either side of the walkway. Three people may be seen walking in a group at a distance wearing masks." or "A scene pans to the front podium of an otherwise empty classroom. The black chalkboard includes in writing "2019 Words of the Year" underlined, followed by a list: (my) pronouns, they, quid pro quo, ok boomer, and I oop-, nobody, people of means, im [drawing of a peach]."
      • Why? Visual descriptions helps support blind and low-vision attendees, as well as others whose processing requires additional auditory information of visuals, gain access to the visuals of the video.
  3. If slides are used:
    1. Accessible slides and PDF (PDF must be confirmed for accessibility using Acrobat Pro.)
      • Why? Developing accessible slides helps people who use screen reader; are blind, low-vision, or colorblind; and who need visuals that are not overwhelming and easy to follow
    2. Visual description practices when referencing and discussing visuals on the poster
      • Why? Describing visuals, such as graphs, maps, pictures, cartoons, etc., and reading text on your slides helps support people who are blind or low-vision, who have a visual processing disorder, or who better process information through verbal explanations of visuals gain access to the visuals of the presentation

*If you selected to provide a "TalkBack Event", please also review the accessibility expectations below.

Return to Table of Contents

*TalkBack Event

While TalkBack events are tied to view-on-demand events, TalkBack event hosts are also expected to be aware of accessible practices that should take place during a virtual live event. 

  1. Accessible introductions of all speakers
    • Why? An accessible introduction helps support blind and low-vision attendees, as well as others whose processing requires additional auditory information of visuals and provides visual access to each speaker.
  2. Announcement of each participant prior to speaking (i.e. “This is Ed.” “Nate speaking.”)
    • Why? Announcements prior to speaking helps people who are D/deaf, hard-of-hearing, blind, low-vision, or have an auditory processing disorder more easily follow the conversation.

Additionally, we encourage TalkBack event hosts to review how to host an accessible virtual meeting

Return to Table of Contents

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